Review: Paris for One by Jojo Moyes

Paris for One by Jojo Moyes

Paris for One by Jojo Moyes
Publication date: 5 February 2015
Publisher: Penguin UK
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 9781405918930
Length: 95 pages
Genre: Chick lit
Age group: Adult
Source: Publisher
Add it: Goodreads
Buy it: Amazon UK | The Book Depository
My rating: 4.5 Stars

Nell is twenty-six and has never been to Paris. She has never even been on a weekend away with her boyfriend. Everyone knows she is just not the adventurous type.

But, when her boyfriend doesn’t turn up for their romantic mini-break, Nell has the chance to prove everyone wrong.

Alone in Paris, Nell meets the mysterious moped-riding Fabien and his group of carefree friends. Could this turn out to be the most adventurous weekend of her life?

Although I’ve read hundreds of amazing reviews of Jojo Moyes’s books and everyone I know adores her stories, I’ve never had the chance – or the time – to pick them up myself. So when Paris for One was released as part of the Quick Reads initiative, I jumped at the opportunity and decided to give it a go.

With only 95 pages, Moyes’s novel is a super quick read. Just like the rest of the Quick Reads titles, Paris for One is aimed at those who, for whatever reason, find reading a difficult and daunting task. However, it doesn’t mean that you, as a bookworm who can easily devour a book in a day, won’t enjoy it. In fact, it’s perfect for days when you’re running errands and you know there will be some waiting time here and there. Whether you need to pop into the post office, do the school run or you’re about to go on a quick lunch break, it’s a perfect companion. I loved the fact that I could read during my lunch break without having to carry a 400-page long hardback with me, like I did the week before.

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Showcase Sunday #98

Inspired by Pop Culture Junkie and the Story Siren, the aim of Showcase Sunday is to highlight our newest books or book related swag and to see what everyone else received for review, borrowed from libraries, bought in bookshops and downloaded onto eReaders each week. For more information about how this feature works and how to join in, click here.

Hello everyone! How are you? :) How has your weekend been so far? I had a lazy day yesterday (although I did manage to go to the library and book shopping, so it wasn’t that lazy) but I’m dedicating today to blogging and catching up on all my reviews*. I have at least 5 reviews to write and I want to schedule some other posts for the next couple of weeks as well. I’ll  be away at the beginning of March, visiting my family, so it’d be nice to have something scheduled for that week.

* If you see me lurking on Twitter, feel free to shout at me!

Incoming

Unspeakable by Abbie Rushton

Unspeakable | A Question of Proof | Hold the Dark
An English Boy in New York | Gone Girl | The Third Woman

I had an amazing week book-wise. All the books I was waiting for arrived last week, so I wasn’t expecting anything else to turn up… but somehow I ended up with six new books. Oops!
An English Boy in New York by Tom Easton

This time last week I started Boys Don’t Knit by T.S. Easton and fell in love with Ben’s story within a few pages. I would’ve read it in one sitting if I didn’t have other things to do – it’s HILARIOUS! (My full review will be posted soon) So I popped into our local library yesterday and borrowed the sequel, An English Boy in New York, which I’m starting today. Can’t wait!

Unspeakable is a giveaway win from Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl, and another book I’ve heard amazing things about. Thank you, Jana and Atom!

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Rediscover the Joy of Reading with Galaxy Quick Reads

Galaxy Quick Reads 2015

On 5 February 2015, six very special books hit the shelves of bookshops, libraries and supermarkets around the UK. The six 2015 Galaxy Quick Reads titles were written by renowned authors (such as Jojo Moyes and Sophie Hannah) and aim to help adults rediscover the pleasure of reading. Since I think it’s a brilliant initiative and it deserves more recognition, I wanted to dedicate today’s post to these books and talk about why I love them so much – and why you will too.

What are Quick Reads, you ask?

Priced just £1, Galaxy Quick Reads titles are just like regular books. However, they are shorter and much easier to tackle for adults who are either less confident in their reading skills or over time have become lapsed readers.

What is the aim of this initiative?

Founded in 2006, the Quick Reads initiative was launched to help the UK’s one in six adults of working age who have difficulty reading, as well as the one in three adults who do not read for pleasure.

People’s reasons for not reading are varied but are often based in fear. Some people say they find books scary and intimidating, thinking they are ‘not for them’ or that books are difficult or boring. Quick Reads’ aim is to challenge these beliefs and demonstrate that books and reading can be for everyone.

Why Quick Reads are perfect for everyone

About two weeks ago, a small parcel landed on my doorstep. I received one of the newest QR titles, Paris for Two One by Jojo Moyes, which was accompanied by a bar of chocolate. (The perfect combination, if you ask me!)

Galaxy Quick Reads 2015

And even though reading is something I’ve always enjoyed and I’ve never found it a daunting or difficult task, I fell in love with this book. While reading comes naturally to me, one thing I seem to be struggling with at the moment is time.

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Showcase Sunday #97 – The YA Edition

Inspired by Pop Culture Junkie and the Story Siren, the aim of Showcase Sunday is to highlight our newest books or book related swag and to see what everyone else received for review, borrowed from libraries, bought in bookshops and downloaded onto eReaders each week. For more information about how this feature works and how to join in, click here.

Hello everyone and welcome back! How are you, my chums? Good week? Mine was pretty good – exhausting, but good. :) I was invited to the launch of William Giraldi’s latest crime novel, Hold the Dark, on Wednesday, which was pretty awesome. We went to Icebar in Central London, which is exactly what it sounds like – a bar. Made entirely of ice. It was an amazing experience and it was so lovely to finally meet some people from the publisher, who I’ve been chatting to online for the past few years. I’m hoping to post some pictures here on the blog so keep your eyes peeled!

It was another great week for books as well. I went a bit YA-mad in the past couple of days and ordered two books from Foyles. Because I clearly don’t have another 200 books to read… *glances at towering TBR pile* Anyway, moving swiftly on. I also got two review copies – one middle grade and one YA, which is a nice change from all those thrillers I’ve read in the past couple of months.

Incoming

Butter by Erin Lange
It's Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini
The A to Z of You and Me by James Hannah
Stonebird by Mike Revell

Butter | Stonebird | It’s Kind of a Funny Story | The A-Z of You and Me

I absolutely love Erin Lange’s work. But, unlike every normal person, I’ve read her latest one, Dead Ends, first and haven’t had the opportunity to pick up Butter yet. Dead Ends made me completely fall in love with her style so I’m pretty sure I will adore this one as well. Stonebird is a middle-grade novel, which was a review copy from Mike and Quercus – thanks, guys! The cover is just gorgeous (the photos don’t really do it justice) and I have a feeling it’s going to be a beautiful story. Mike is actually guest posting on the blog in the near future, so watch this space!

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Showcase Sunday #96

Inspired by Pop Culture Junkie and the Story Siren, the aim of Showcase Sunday is to highlight our newest books or book related swag and to see what everyone else received for review, borrowed from libraries, bought in bookshops and downloaded onto eReaders each week. For more information about how this feature works and how to join in, click here.

Hello everyone and happy Sunday! How are you? :) How was your week? Mine was pretty hectic (hence the lack of updates – again!) so I’m having a lazy weekend for a change. I pretty much spent yesterday lying in bed and catching up with TV shows, but I’m hoping to get some reading and blogging done today. In the meantime, here are the books I got this week.

Incoming

 How to Love by Katie Cotugno

Black Lands by Belinda Bauer

The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbraith

The Cuckoo's Calling

After the Crash | How to Love | Blacklands | The Cuckoo’s Calling

After the Crash is a French crime novel, which was kindly sent to me by Orion Books. I actually don’t know too much about this one (or the author’s work) but I was intrigued by the synopsis. It’s not out until next month but I’ll keep you posted! How to Love was a gift from lovely Debbie from Snuggling on the Sofa – I’ve read mixed reviews of this one but I wanted to give it a go. I haven’t read enough contemporary novels lately so this will be perfect. Thanks so much, Debbie! :)

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Showcase Sunday #95

Inspired by Pop Culture Junkie and the Story Siren, the aim of Showcase Sunday is to highlight our newest books or book related swag and to see what everyone else received for review, borrowed from libraries, bought in bookshops and downloaded onto eReaders each week. For more information about how this feature works and how to join in, click here.

Hello everyone and happy Sunday! How was your week? What are your plans for the weekend – or what’s left of it? :) I had a pretty busy day yesterday – I took my new camera for a test ride in Greenwich (one of my favourite places around London), and it took longer than I expected. It was a lovely day, though, despite the freezing weather!

It was an amazing week book-wise, so I have lots of brilliant reads to show you today. If you’re all sitting comfortably and have your tea or coffee at hand, I’ll begin.

Incoming

Showcase Sunday #95

The Ship by Antonia Honeywell
The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy | The Serpent Papers | Us | The Ship | Love Hurts

A few weeks ago I came home to the news that I’ve been accepted for Curtis Brown’s very own – and very new – online book club, starting this January. And, before January’s book club read landed on our doorsteps, they sent us all a lovely welcome package. Mine included the first three books on the list – The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy, The Serpent Papers and Us. I’ve heard a million great things about both the first Harold Fry book and David Nicholls’ novels, so I can’t wait to pick these up.

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Review: The Girl on the Train – Paula Hawkins

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Publication date: 15 January 2015
Publisher: Doubleday
Format: Hardback
ISBN: 9780857522313
Length: 384 pages
Genre: Thriller
Age group: Adult
Source: Publisher
Add it: Goodreads
Buy it: Amazon UK | The Book Depository
My rating: 5 Stars

You don’t know her. But she knows you.

Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She’s even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. ‘Jess and Jason’, she calls them. Their life – as she sees it – is perfect. If only Rachel could be that happy.

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough.

Now everything’s changed. Now Rachel has a chance to become a part of the lives she’s only watched from afar. Now they’ll see; she’s much more than just the girl on the train…

With its intriguing premise and Transworld’s reputation for publishing some of the best thrillers I’ve ever read, The Girl on the Train was one of my most anticipated novels of 2015 – and it completely blew me away. Hawkins’s debut took the blogosphere by storm and it has every right to be at the top of the charts. It’s so brilliantly written, so unpredictable and so full of twists and turns that I read the second half in one sitting and would willingly give it 6 stars if I could.

One of the (many) reasons why it stood out for me is its narration. Rachel, our main character and narrator, is alcoholic. She’s had drinking problems for quite a while and she even lost her job because of it. And why it’s interesting, as far as the story is concerned, is because she’s unreliable. She often drinks herself to a state where she completely blacks out and has no memory of what she’s done when she wakes up the next morning. Add this to a story where she is the only witness and you’ll have no idea what to believe.

All the characters are brilliantly – and very cleverly – written, in a way that makes it impossible for you to know who to trust or who to believe. Not just Rachel, but everyone has their own version of events and they are all acting suspiciously in one way or another. I love books with unreliable narrators and The Girl on the Train was no exception.

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